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Talks

2018

EuroPython; Edinburgh, UK – July 2018

In this talk, I give an insight into what it means to maintain a popular project for me personally, what it involves and what we as a community can do to help out and finally why I think it’s an important discussion to have.

Cookiecutter is a command-line utility that creates projects from templates. It is free and open-source software distributed under the terms of a permissive BSD-3 license. With around 180 individual contributors, more than 1000 public templates on GitHub alone, and multiple talks at conferences, it is fair to say that there is a small community around it.

But who are the people behind the project and what is it that they are doing?

It’s been three years since I was granted the commit bit by the core team. I have learned a lot about FOSS communities and also about myself. At times I struggle with balancing my day job as a full-time Software Engineer and maintaining Cookiecutter and other FOSS projects in my spare time. By now I’m OK with not responding to issues immediately and closing pull requests. However it took me quite a while to get to this point.

Maintaining FOSS projects can be incredibly rewarding and fun, but it can also be quite frustrating. It involves so much more than writing code or merging PRs, and yet sometimes it feels like that’s what most people think.

Abstract | Deck

2017

Hi, my name is README!

Write the Docs Europe; Prague, Czechia – Sept 2017

A good README briefly and concisely explains what your software does, how it can be installed and what API it exposes. You also want to provide information on the requirements, the license it uses and how the project is managed. Who are you? How to get in touch to report problems and give feedback? Where can potential users find the Code of Conduct for your project?

This talk is for everyone who is interested in working on open source projects and wants to know how documentation can help newcomers and more experienced users use your code and to encourage them to engage in the community.

Abstract | Deck

Hi, my name is README!

EuroPython; Rimini, Italy – July 2017

A good README briefly and concisely explains what your software does, how it can be installed and what API it exposes. You also want to provide information on the requirements, the license it uses and how the project is managed. Who are you? How to get in touch to report problems and give feedback? Where can potential users find the Code of Conduct for your project?

This talk is for everyone who is interested in working on open source projects and wants to know how documentation can help newcomers and more experienced users use your code and to encourage them to engage in the community.

Abstract | Deck

Kickstarting projects with Cookiecutter

PyData Berlin; Berlin, Germany – July 2017

Cookiecutter is a command-line utility that generates projects from templates. You can use cookiecutter to create new Python projects and to generate the initial code for different types of applications. I gave an introduction to cookiecutter, how to install it from PyPI, how to use the CLI and finally how to author your own template.

Abstract | Deck


2016

What’s new in pytest 3.0

EuroPython; Bilbao, Spain – July 2016

In this talk I highlighted some of the most impactful changes of the latest major release of pytest - an open source testing framework for the Python language. I demonstrated new features, addressed important bugfixes, backwards incompatible changes as well as deprecations.

Abstract | Deck

Cookiecutter - or what we can learn from templates

Python Glasgow; Glasgow, UK – Feb 2016

I talked about why it is a good idea to use templates for kickstarting new projects, how templates can help on-boarding new team members, and finally why Cookiecutter is a great tool for working with templates.

Deck


2015

Cookiecutter: Come to the Dark Side!

EuroPython; Bilbao, Spain – July 2015

In this presentation, I talked about my involvement in the Cookiecutter project, highlighted a range of useful templates, and demonstrated how to use it to generate a Python Kivy app, ready for deployment to Android mobile devices.

Deck